Eps 1471: How becoming a father made me a millionaire

— The too lazy to register an account podcast

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Miriam Lucas

Miriam Lucas

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My father only took it upon himself to set an example for me. However, when the time came for my father to start a family of his own, the curse of fatherlessness overtook him. Unlike the years when my father trained with other chefs to learn how to be successful in the kitchen, my father had no role models to show him how to be a family man. He persevered from working as an apprentice at the Hilton Hotel in Nairobi to head chef at the Hilton Hotel in London at the age of 21.
Born an orphan in Kenya, my father was orphaned at 14 when his foster parents died. As immigrants from India, my parents had already experienced difficulties in pursuing the American dream. My parents hoped that young Shang Saavedra would perpetuate the immigrant's dream and become rich, giving their hard work meaning and value. Under my parents' guidance, in addition to college financial support, I acquired the financial literacy and tools to become financially independent at an early age.
While working in the young Shan Saavedra's first job, I realized that some of what my parents taught me would be counterproductive to my personal financial goals. Then my husband and I made the radical decision to become more frugal so that my parents could reach the 50 percent savings rate, invest, and retire early. The achievement meant that a few years later, young Shan Saavedra could focus on our family, taking a year of maternity leave and then moving on to part-time work in early 2021 without ever having to worry about finances. About five years after adopting these new frugality habits, my parents successfully increased our savings and found an opportunity to work at will.
Of course, my family raised enough money, sold the child, went around the world. My family dream home was to be "My Family" as an escape from a cramped little house in projects I shared with my parents, my paternal grandmother and my parents' three brothers.
At 16, in the bedroom I shared with my brother, I started my first real business. Many of my more affluent parent friends were entrepreneurs, so one day I told my father that I wanted to be an entrepreneur too. My parents painstakingly learned to speak different languages ​​as working adults, emphasized the importance of education, and encouraged young Shan Saavedra to get good grades so he could get into a good university and get a good job.
Her parents wanted them to marry a wealthy man, not a sleazy third-year science graduate, no matter how smart, handsome, or funny he might be. They were slightly unpleasant to his then newborn son, but not enough for the girl he really liked to complain about. On that Thanksgiving day, Eddie took his then-newborn son home to meet his parents, and it was a disaster.
At first, the son, then still a newborn, liked to swarm, then little by little he realized that the girls did not need him. The girl he liked very much insisted that her son and then still newborn join his parents at the celebration of Christmas. A girl he liked a lot noticed her parents' campaign to humiliate Sam Sutton and became furious.
He had no idea that his father had a hard time making this purchase, or that he might regret the decision. When I saw a father struggling with the financial decision to buy a flute for his daughter, I thought about the psychological barriers involved in considering his options. The little girl was completely oblivious to her father's financial worries.
In the silence of that car ride, I thought about my parents' lack of money, my disappointment, and my parents' sadness. When I left a record store like this as a child, I felt the weight of my parents' financial hardship and the pain of my parents for letting me down. Acknowledging my parents' financial difficulties helped me see the world differently.
I am grateful for the financial journey that resulted from that quiet moment in the back of my parents' car. We could not have lived the last two years as parents without the help of our friends and family, and for that we are very grateful. Many of us are indebted to ourselves and our parents who donated all their time and money to help us give life everything we have.
At the start of the school year, it wasn't hard for my parents to put food on the table or buy backpacks and clothes. My mother's teacher salary alone is not enough for the lifestyle she wants to live. My mother received financial support from her father because as a teacher and a divorced mother of two, she couldn't make ends meet on her own.