Eps 1: Military conspiracy

Military Podcast and aliens too

Host image: StyleGAN neural net
Content creation: GPT-2, transformers, CTRL

Host

Ronnie Rodriguez

Ronnie Rodriguez

Podcast Content
Many conspiracy theories involve secret government plans and elaborate assassination plots. When it comes to conspiracy theories, belief that Big Government will do anything to carry out a mass deception is not limited to the fringe fringe. While it can be funny to make jokes about strange beliefs that people have, a widespread belief in weird conspiracies is really more a reflection of their distrust in their own government, or of authorities generally.
The most widely held theories about the US government are an illustration of this mistrust. Perhaps the best-known conspiracy theory within its own government, other than President Kennedys death, is that the moon landings never happened. The death of President Kennedy President Kennedy, and the fallout from that, had all the makings of a Hollywood-made conspiracy thriller, and Americans watched the whole thing unfold on TV. They revealed the KGB had been spreading the conspiracies the CIA was involved in, using fake documents created in the wake of President Kennedys death.
Why this myth has persisted is anybodys guess, but a physicist developed a mathematical model which said it would take a conspiratorial effort by 411,000 people to keep the secret about a planned Moon landing, and would still be exposed after less than four years. The Columbia hoax has led to one of the most prominent conspiracy theories in the world, claiming the Illuminati are secretly pushing for a proposed New World Order. Enthralled with this narrative, believers of QAnon have taken matters into their own hands, committing numerous crimes including bringing weapons into Washington, D.C., killing Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, allegedly plotting to assassinate Joe Biden and Hillary Clinton on Facebook, then driving onto the piers in Manhattan carrying cars filled with knives, and killing the head of the New York City Mob, following claims the CIA had penetrated the Mob. For three years, adherents of the sprawling QAnon conspiracy have combed through anonymous web postings by a figure named Q and analyzed the claims of a cabal of child-sex predators outed by President Trump that includes prominent Democrats, Hollywood elites, and deep state allies .
QAnon conspiracy theory believers predicted that January 20 would be the day of the Great Awakening or The Storm, when outgoing President Trump would expose the alleged cabal of Satan-worshipping paedophile cannibal elites and declare martial law, meaning he would remain in power, and lead to the mass arrest and execution of top Democrats or other alleged cabal members . The QAnon conspiracy theory supporters anticipated that January 20 would be the day of Great Awakening or The Storm when outgoing President Trump would expose the supposed cabal of Satan-worshipping pedophile cannibal elites and declare martial law, meaning he would remain in power, and leading to mass arrests and executions of top Democrats or other supposed members of the cabal . The central element in their conspiracy theory is President Donald Trumps collaboration with a small army of intelligence officers waging a dark war against the feared cabal of Satan-worshipping, baby-eating, child-eating, and child-eating liberals.
Social media users shared posts making various claims related to the QAnon conspiracy theory, including that martial law and the Insurrection Act were invoked; that power was transferred from outgoing President Trump to the military, rather than to President Joe Biden; that mass arrests were made; that Biden is not the president; and that Trump would return to power on March 4. The various claims related to the QAnon conspiracy theory, including that martial law and the Insurrection Act were invoked; that mass arrests were made; that Biden is not president; that Trump would return to power on March 4. The Insurrection Act were invoked; that power was transferred from outgoing President Trump to the military, rather than to President Joe Biden; that there were mass arrests; that there were mass arrests were made; that Biden is not president; and that Trump would return to power on March 4. The Insurrection Act were called into effect. QAnon conspiracy theory The Insurrection Act has been invoked.
In the 2020 elections, more than 60 candidates running for office, mostly Republican, have expressed some level of support for various elements of their conspiracy theories. Conspiracy theories claiming Armenians have secret political power are widespread in Azerbaijan and promoted by the government, including by President Ilham Aliyev. The findings spawned theories ranging from extraterrestrials to secret governments or military experiments.
The "Chemtrail" conspiracy suggests that part of the condensation trails are not water vapour at all, but rather are high-secret chemicals used on Americans by their own governments for some evil purpose. Conspiracy theorists allege government agents are using directed energy weapons and electronic surveillance to target members of the public. Conspiracy theorists frequently focus on new military technologies, both real and imagined.
Although the individual, named Robert Lazare, is discredited, his claims have given rise to a number of government conspiracy theories, most involving alien life. Under two separate schemes, a military contractor and several conspirators would manipulate some government contracts, obtaining over $15 million from the U.S. on these contracts. From at least as early as May 2013 until at least April 2018, a military contractor formed agreements with multiple co-conspirators to rig the bidding on certain government contracts in order to create a false appearance of competition and to obtain payments from the government, and to defraud the United States, according to the indictment.
A federal grand jury in the Eastern District of Texas, Texas, returned an indictment charging the military contractor with rigging bids for state military contracts in Texas and Michigan, and defrauding the United States. A military contractor was charged in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas with one count of rigging a bid, a violation of the Sherman Act, and two counts of conspiring to defraud the United States.